News Articles with Topic: Social Science / Education

Want to know L.A.'s Latinx story? Follow the music posters

Beginning around 1990, the demographic landscape of the Los Angeles area changed dramatically through an infusion of immigrants from Mexico and Central America. But historian Jorge Leal says its impact on the neighborhoods of the Los Angeles area has never been charted in earnest. With his recently published research, Leal...

University of Maryland scholar is UCR’s next CHASS dean

Daryle Williams is a historian who co-directs the online database Enslaved.org.

UCR faculty member's book shares stories of teachers of color

“What are you … on their side?” The comment was one of many snarky remarks white teachers made about interactions between a Latino colleague and his diverse student population. In the staff lounge at the Sacramento, Calif., public school, the same teachers called the students “monkeys bouncing off the walls”...

Experts discuss the ‘coming out’ of nonbinary people

UCR experts say Demi Lovato’s public announcement amplifies the conversation about gender identity.

Should we live in the moment — or not?

John Martin Fischer, a leading philosopher of free will and moral responsibility, has written two companion essays exploring the ideas of mindfulness and living in the moment, which are often encapsulated in the phrase: “Be here now.” In the first piece, published by Aeon, Fischer sorts through various theories regarding...

'Love thy neighbor, mask up'

Both religious and patriotic messages helped persuade white evangelicals to wear masks to protect against COVID-19. The lessons may carry over to vaccine messaging.

Juvenile incarceration has mixed effects on future convictions

Juvenile Incarceration is a double-edged sword and rehabilitation programs may improve welfare of convicted juveniles

‘Uncovering the buried past of early Korean American history’ in Riverside

The book ‘Pachappa Camp: The First Koreatown in the United States’ was published this week by Professor Edward T. Chang.

Scholar will learn Indigenous language with grant

Alejandra Dubcovsky, an associate professor of history at UC Riverside, has received a $231,000 award from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a fellowship during which she will work to become one of the few historians working with the Indigenous language Timucua. The fellowship, called a New Directions Fellowship...

By J.D. Warren | | Social Science / Education

Researchers seek input from Inland Empire parents, caregivers of school-age children

Study by UC Riverside researchers will examine impacts of remote learning on families with children in grades K-12

By Tess Eyrich | | Social Science / Education

Monuments that matter

Paper urges archaeologists and historians to work closely with people who are grappling with racism in public monuments

By Holly Ober | | Social Science / Education

Border surge's cause is more complicated than COVID-19

The United States border has seen an increase in families — primarily men with their children — and most recently a surge in unaccompanied minors traveling north from Central America through Mexico. They are fleeing gang violence, high homicide rates, and lack of economic opportunities. In some cases, such as...

This is the dawning of the age of the vaccine passport

The vaccine passport is coming. The likelihood of a “passport” being required — or perhaps just requested — for travel, and to return to school and work, seems a certainty. New York state is testing a smartphone app that would verify vaccine status for entry into events. IBM is developing...

By UCR News | | Social Science / Education

UCR poll: 'If it's Trump vs. Newsom, Newsom wins'

A poll of UC Riverside social sciences professors holds that Gov. Gavin Newsom should prevail in the current recall effort against him. Two committees, RescueCalifornia.org and RecallGavin2020.com, have launched efforts to gain 1.5 million signatures to put a Newsom recall on the ballot. The deadline for submitting signatures is March...

By J.D. Warren | | Social Science / Education

Why some people vote against their own beliefs

Many low-education voters who embrace social welfare programs vote against their own beliefs, new UC Riverside research holds. The mitigating factor is education: The more education one has, the more likely one is to stick to one’s policy preferences. “It means candidates who employ tactics such as fear and attaching...

By J.D. Warren | | Social Science / Education

An ancient Maya ambassador’s bones show a life of privilege and hardship

Ajpach’ Waal forged an alliance between two dynasties but died in obscurity

Center for Social Innovation tapped for equity project

The Southern California Association of Governments, or SCAG, the nation’s largest metropolitan planning organization representing six counties, 191 cities, and more than 18 million residents, has chosen the Center for Social Innovation at UC Riverside to conduct research and offer insights and recommendations to advance economic inclusion and equity across...

By UCR News | | Social Science / Education

Navigating the $1.9 trillion stimulus

March 8, President Biden was set to sign into law the American Rescue Plan, a $1.9 trillion economic stimulus that will provide $1,400 checks to millions of low- and middle-income Americans, new child tax benefits, and extend unemployment payments. It also includes a restaurant rescue fund, money for reopening schools...

UC systemwide survey reveals disparities among undocumented students

Findings include greater instances of depression, financial instability, and lower grade point averages.

Partners help us stay connected during pandemic

A pair of UCR studies reveal that living with a romantic partner helps people feel more socially connected during COVID-19. But no other pandemic-era social dynamic carries notable benefits, the researchers found: not your kids, not kibitzing with your bestie on FaceTime, and not your adorable-adoring pets. “Research prior to...

By J.D. Warren | | Social Science / Education